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On April 7, 1840, Julia may have noticed the “Weekly List of Internments” in The Herald.

The list was as follows:
Weekly Report of Internments.
In the City and County of New York, from the 28th day of
March to the 4th day of April, 1840.
31 men, 19 women; 47 boys; 32 girls. Total 129.
DISEASES.-
Asthma 1, asphyxy 1; apoplexy 1, abscess 0, bleeding 1, bleeding from lungs 0, burned-,spalded 1, casualties 3, colic 0, cancer 0, consumption 26, convulsions 9, croup or hives 2, debility 0, delirium tremens 2, diarrhea 1, death from poison 2, dropsy 4, dropsy in the head 6, dropsy in the chest 1, drowned 4, dysentery 1, epilepsy 0, erysipelas 0, fever 0, fever bilious 0, fever typhoid 2, fever scarlet 8, fever puerperal 4,fever remittent 2, fever intermittent 1; whooping cough 0, inflammation of bladder 1, inflammation of brain 9, inflammation of womb 1, inflammation of chest 2, inflammation of lungs 6, inflammation of bowels 7, inflammation of stomach 1, inflammation of heart 1, insanity 0, jaundice 1, killed or murdered 1, marasmus 3, malformation 0, measles 0, old age 2, organic disease of the heart 1, palsy 1, small pox 3, sprae 1, teething 1, tumor 0, unknown 2, worms 2.

AGE:- Of one year and under, 23; between 1 and 2, 8; 2 and
5, 16; 5 and 10, 9; 10 and 20, 5; 20 and 30; 19; 30 and 40, 14; 40 and
50, 8; 50 and 60, 4; 60 and 70, 2; 70 and 80, 5; 80 and 90, 1; un-
known 0.
PLACES OF NATIVITY- United States 103, Ireland 18, England
3, Scotland 2, Russia 0, Wales 0, Sweden 0, British Pos’ns N.
American 0, Germany 3.
FROM.- Alms House, Bellevue, 8; Hospital, do, 5; Fever
Hospital, do, 0; New Jersey, 0; Long Island, 2; Blackwell’s
Island, 0; Small Pox Hospital, 1; City Hospital, 3; Penitentia-
ry, 0; Westchester, 1.
Colored persons, 7.
WILLIAM A. WALTERS, City Inspector.
City Inspector’s Office, April 4, 1840.

The following is a list of some of the diseases mentioned above:

Apoplexy: bleeding from a stroke.

Delirium Tremens
Delirium seen in severe cases of alcohol withdrawal complicated by exhaustion, lack of food, and dehydration, usually preceded by physical deterioration due to vomiting and restlessness. The whole body trembles, sometimes with seizures, disorientation, and hallucinations. Delirium tremens lasts 3–10 days, with a reported death rate of up to 20 percent, if untreated. Hallucinations may develop independently of delirium tremens and may last days to weeks.

Anasarca, also called Dropsy, a severe, generalized form of edema.

Erysipelas
A contagious infection of the skin and underlying tissue, caused by group A B-hemolytic streptococcus bacteria. Erysipelas causes affected areas of skin to turn bright red and become slightly swollen. The swollen blotches have a distinct border and slowly expand into the surrounding skin. The lesions are most commonly seen on the face, scalp, hands, and legs. They feel hot to the touch and the patient is feverish.

Fever Puerperal
Puerperal fever, also called childbed fever, infection of some part of the female reproductive organs following childbirth or abortion. Organisms commonly producing this infection are Streptococcus pyogenes; staphylococci

Marasmus
marasmus /ma·ras·mus/ (mah-raz´mus) a form of protein-energy malnutrition predominantly due to prolonged severe caloric deficit, chiefly occurring in the first year of life, with growth retardation and wasting of subcutaneous fat and muscle.

(Thank you, Bonnie Soper for the transcription)

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