January 19, 1852 – “Broadway full of fun and frolic”

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Monday. 19. January. 1852.
Clear, very cold. Snow deep.

Julia hoped for a sleigh, and gave
three groans for the Omnibus.
Mr H. employed a boy, to clean our walk; sat some
time to watch him
I went around the house, and swept, dusted
putting things in order.
Dressed and was so unfortunate as to cut my toe.
but hope it will pass over.
Have not touched my work basket this day; how
time flies, and our duties accumulate;
Life is truly short; too short for dreams & sloth.
We must awake from our slumbers for our days
are swifter than the wind.
I do not get through my work, or the tasks of day
as I could wish.
Broadway, full of fun and frolic, the snow, puts
every one in good spirits.
Splendid equipages , crowded with belles skim the streets,
and the huge Omnibuses on runners look like worlds.
Louis & Remsen went to ride. G. looks on the fun
but does not care, to participate.

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January 17 and 18, 1852 – “Young Julia out too late with the Dr and a great storm” (I missed half of 17 yesterday)

Saturday. 17. Jan. 1852.

Clear, cold day.
We were very late to rise
and behind [hand] with our work.
I dressed for visiting, sent for a carriage.
Isabella came in at 12. Took a lunch. We set off on
our jaunt.
Accomplished five visits. Mrs. Van Santwood, Wisoner,
Burgoyne, Willard and Mothers.
Mrs Burgonye [sic] not at home, her house beautifully
furnished. We looked over it, in good taste.
I was pleased with Mrs Wisoner, she looks delicate.
Returned home to dinner.
Mrs Woodruff, and Miss Hornblower came in, and Mary.
Mary felt sick, her mother, obliged to go home with
her.
We took dinner in some confusion. the boys, anxious
to get off to dancing school.
Mr H. came in to carve. We all ate hearty.

Julia invited to Rima’s, much to my sorrow.
Ferdinand came in to tea, our table very
inviting. Mr H. went to town, came in late, looks pale.
Julia, dressed and went off with Louis; not untill 8
oclock.
Bell left before ten. Gave F. some scraps.
I went to bed tired out, with my days exertion.
A violent pain, after dinner, but I braved it out, and
got over it before tea.
Julia, came home after eleven, with Dr. Duvall, I was in
bed, and had been asleep. Was anxious to hear her voice, and
wish myself her father, as then she should never be under
the protection of strangers.
A friend from afar; she never wrote me this winter.
Julia, exchanged a pair of boots, and was measured for a thick pair took
a pair of Rubber sandals from Rykman [sic].
___________

Sunday. 18 Jan. 1852.

A deep snow, and still the storm continues

This is called a great Snow, not
surpassed for the last twenty years.
I should love to be in the country, to see the effect
of this White drapery on mountains, and trees.
We are prevented from going to church. Few
will brave this storm; and churches will be empty.
I passed the day reading, did not get up untill near
ten oclock. bed so charming, and my bones wearied.

Duvall, and Stuart Smith, called in a carriage
sat an hour. Both uncongenial to my taste.
I am surprised at this attention. Do not discover
much sense, or conversational power in the Dr
and think the outside, the chief attraction.

January 16 and 17, 1852 – “Young Julia’s voice lessons and a day of making calls”

Friday 16. Jan. 1852.
A slight fall of Snow.
I felt very dull to.day,
and could not help the feeling. The cause was sufficient
for Sorrow.
Made stocks for the boys and mended Julia’s gar.ments.
G. paid Mrs Falconers bill.
Mr Laiti [Leati], gave his lesson to Julia, expresses him.
self pleased.
Duvall met him. Jane, and Mr Taft passed the evening;
Love does not improve its v____s.

Louis and Remsen went to Mr Stars exhibitions in
the university. Had their hair cut.

Saturday. 17. Jan. 1852.

Clear, cold day.
We were very late to rise
and behind [hand] with our work.
I dressed for visiting, sent for a carriage.
Isabella came in at 12. Took a lunch. We set off on
our jaunt.
Accomplished five visits. Mrs. Van Santwood, Wisoner,
Burgoyne, Willard and Mothers.
Mrs Burgonye [sic] not at home, her house beautifully
furnished. We looked over it, in good taste.
I was pleased with Mrs Wisoner, she looks delicate.
Returned home to dinner.
Mrs Woodruff, and Miss Hornblower came in, and Mary.
Mary felt sick, her mother, obliged to go home with
her.
We took dinner in some confusion. the boys, anxious
to get off to dancing school.
Mr H. came in to carve. We all ate hearty.

January 15, 1852 – “Garret very ill and young Julia had Dr. Duvall and friends over”

Thursday. 15. Jan. 1852.
Very mild, snow melting off, Sun bright, and warm.

What a change from the late frosty air,
A true Spring day. Julia almost lost her breakfast.
I went at eleven oclock to the stage, rode down to see Bell.
A fine ride through Broadway.
Mrs Brown, in the stage, looking pale, in deep black.
We did not recognize each other at first, both in deep mourning.
Isabella from home, left a card and written
message on it for her. Rode to Mrs Falconers, she altered my
bill, over.charged a few dollars.
Walked home, the streets miserable for ladies, I pity them
and their nice skirts.
No company this morning, will put up
my clean clothes.
I am very well this morning and hope the trifling
cold in my head will pass off. Thus far, have been spared
any serious streak on my lungs, many are falling victims to
this disease; and a kind providence still preserves me.
It is a fearful scourge, and one we must submit too [sic] with.
out murmuring, our father appoints our chastenings.
All the members of my family, seem at the present
stage of their life, to be inclined to [chase] complaints; this
is a source of reflection for me.

Maria dined with me, Mr H. not with us, the children came
in late from school. Maria, and Julia left for a walk after
dinner, M. went home.
Mr H. came home about five oclock. looking like death.
He was deadly sick, all the evening, vomiting, and almost
stupefied with sleep. Avoided conversation.
His corpe [sic] like appearance shocked me; and he laid on the
sofa untill after eleven oclock.

Rima, Fanny, Outlaw, Duvall, and Cornell came in to pass
the evening. They danced, and sung, had a fine time.
I felt too sad, to go in the midst of such Mirth.

The Scoop on Dr. Agrippa (Agrippe) Duvall

Courtesy of Kathy Browning

The infamous Dr. Duvall was born in Anne Arundale, Maryland in 1828, therefore making him 24 in 1852. Young Julia appears to be only 14!

Agrippa attended Dickerson College in Pennsylvania between 1846-1848. He may have been there longer.

He graduated as a physician from the University of New York in 1852. (You will learn more about that in further diary entries)

Agrippa did go back south after he graduated medical school and married a Mary Francis Smith in 1854. He had four children with Mary and died in 1862.  I have been unable to discover the cause and location of his death and if he was killed during the Civil War.It took ten years to find a copy of his photograph so it may yet turn up!